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Due to notes of support and interest, the chatroom BlockBusters is now open.  If you are interested in moderating and have a calm, patient moderator personality, note me.  I'll be there from time to time but definitely would love to have someone with experience and understanding of creative block, burnout, depression and so on who will be there more often.  Note me!

It's been suggested by many researchers that creativity and depression are often coexistant in many individuals.  Some say there is a biochemical factor, while others point to the fact that the areas of the brain that are most active during creative processes are also the areas most active during depressive episodes.  Whether the emotional instability spurs the creativity or vice-versa is not certain, but what is certain is that there are many, many of you artists who suffer from manic-depression, schizophrenia, crippling depression and paralyzing burnout.  

Someone very near and dear to me is suffering greatly from the inability to draw, which is how this person earns a living.  What used to be a joy is now terrifying and where once they could spend 16 hours a day happily creating art, they find themself shaking and in tears at the very thought of picking up a pencil.  It's surely the stress of having to please art editors and the critical public, but what I want to ask you all is this: are there any of you who also experience this?  If so, what do you do?  How do you get past the self-doubt and anxiety attacks to become prolific again?  When all inspiration is gone, how do you push yourself through?

I hope some of you will post some of your own wisdom of experience.  And I hope that any of you suffering this right now will find some comfort and guidance.  I hope this can open a discourse on burnout, depression, and work-related problems.  And finally, if anyone wants to open a chatroom (or join one if I open it) focusing on support for the seriously depressed (not just emo.  I'm talking clinically depressed) then post a note here.  I can't fix my friend.  I don't have the experience to fully understand.  So please help.

F102 - Burnout by markus71


Articles of interest:
Brain Regions May Sap or Spur Creativity
Eccentric Artists and Mad Scientists
Defining Mental Illness
Creativity and Burnout
Anxiety Disorder

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:iconlindseycarr:
lindseycarr Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2007   Traditional Artist
I would suggest giving 'The Artists Way' by Julia Cameron a read - but really the person needs to do the excercises. Cameron is a writer and initially started out helping other writers get over creative blocks, but it works just as well for any other kind of artist.

I couldn't recommend it enough, it sent me back to childhood where picking up a pen and drawing had no attachments beyond having fun.
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:iconadokenaihitomi13:
AdokenaiHitomi13 Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2007   Traditional Artist
I'm so sorry about your friend. The only thing I can suggest is taking a break if he/she can. I had to do that, take a break from my job (I'm only 17, so it's just a grocery store job, but it really helped all my problems).
I'm young, but I've had experience in severe depression; I'm on 15 miligrams of Celexa now and it's finally helping, not much else has.
From what it sounds like, your friend really needs a break. He/she needs to relax, remember that they ARE good, obviously if they're getting so many jobs (I assume so, because that would create stress) and that he or she should consider talk therapy along with changing their medications, trying another one. Tell your friend that from one crazy, depressed artist to another, I hope he/she finds peace and security.
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:iconretrozombie:
RetroZombie Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
My goodness! I hate it when I can't get onto dA (at any great length) for a while... I missed this whole thing! I'll try to find time to get onto your new forum, though, if only to offer sage advise and seem with-it and together! (:giggle: yeah, right!)

I hope things are looking up for your friend - being blocked is a real drag! I haven't had it artistically (since I've only been back into it for a short time this time around) but I have had major "slumps" professionally (in software development - which has a large creative component that most people don't appreciate ;)) I've found that the only way to get past those is to get myself onto a completely different project so that I can flush all the baggage that has built up with the one that gave me the slump. That's not always easy, though... but somehow I've managed it several times!

Don't know if that's even a speck of help, but there you have it. ^^;

(On to the next journal! Away! *swoop*)
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:iconhotdamnman:
Hotdamnman Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
Your friends over at wetcanvas.com are having a discusion about this in the creativity forum.
btw, I found you through them.
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:iconlockstock:
lockstock Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
Thanks for the notice!
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:iconthepurplemonster:
thepurplemonster Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Mmm. Burn outs+ depression suck.. I've not gotten to the point of actual anxiety attacks, but I can still sympathize. Its what everybody else has said, I suppose.. proffessional help, family and friends support, etc. I honestly can't think of anything else that helps, because I can't even control it over myself.. it can get really bad, I know. :hug:s to your friend.
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:iconarabianne:
arabianne Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2007
Wow... so glad to finally see this topic discussed somewhere. For as long as I can remember, I can remember periods of depression. At other times, I went through mad wild periods of seething creativity that seemed to pour out of nowhere.

My husband and I have been together for ten years. In the last few years, with his insight, I've been able to see that all of these things may be interconnected. I've never really understood before why sometimes I want to write like there's no tomorrow, or at other times, it's impossible to even make a mark on the paper. And the same thing with my artwork. Sometimes I'm filled with ideas, other times, I can't face another blank page. It was he who first suggested that I might be bipolar.

After facing the possibility, I was able to see where this might be benefitting me greatly in the creative world. I did a lot of research, and came to the conclusion that if this is indeed the case, I've experienced hypomania, which gives me soaring heights of creativity and insight where I'm incredibly productive, and probably only one episode of actual mania in my lifetime (which, to the contrary, is so intense that there's no way to string two thoughts together, much less create something coherent). It would also be a good explanation why antidepressants that I was prescribed while in the depressive phase tipped me over into awful and uncomfortable periods of anxiety.

I know that the option is always out there to go in to the doctor and get an actual diagnosis, but we've discussed it at length, and come to the conclusion that the risks aren't worth it. I can't risk losing my creativity altogether, and I feel that that's what medication would do to me. At this time, if it's indeed bipolar disorder, it's relatively mild. And with both of us aware of my 'patterns' and what they mean, it makes the ground much more stable beneath our feet. I've come to recognize the signals of each mood, and most of the time can utilize the 'up' times to the best advantage, and my family understands and can deal with the 'down' times more easily when they know the 'why'.

I feel like flying when I'm up. When I write, and I'm up, it's as if I'm just a conduit for the muse, as if things just flow through the keys without my input at all. And I find that that's when I do my best, most natural, work. Does anyone else?
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:iconjenevah13:
Jenevah13 Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2007
Alright, this journal came at a very good time. I have a recommendation for Three GREAT books to get on the subject of art and creative blocks etc. :
1. Art & Fear by David Bayles & Ted Orland
2. Fearless Creating by Eric Maisel, Phd.
3. Organizing for the Creative Person by Dorothy Lehmkuhl & Dolores Cotter Lamping.

Funny, I started re-reading these myself recently as I'm still trying to start my new years resolution! (Starting the first of Feb instead) Of trying to get back into my art again.
it's been hard with a 2 year old hanging all over me all day every day, since when I do create I have to be able to really have some time to myself since they're so detailed, I really get into it, so it's been a real struggle the last 6 months or so.
These books are really good for inspiring as well as giving some insight as to why making art can be such a struggle and some of the mental processes behind it all. My copies are very underlined and dogeared! But it seems to be a help to refresh how you think about what it is you want to be doing!
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:iconangelasasser:
AngelaSasser Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2007  Professional General Artist
I may not be in your friend's shoes exactly, but I know constantly working to please teachers and get good grades in my art class has sometimes left me frustrated to tears. Most times, it's a battle between what they want of me and what I want to do.

Most of the time, it takes stepping away from art and reorganizing my thoughts by reading something new (there's nothing like a good story to get me inspired again), discussing my ideas with others for some reassurance, or putting a canvas in front of me and just painting without any idea in my head at all...that's how I managed one of my best images, Dream Regent, during a bout of frustration. [link]

But if your friend is clinically depressed because of a chemical imbalance, my best advice would be to seek medication which can help to solve that imbalance. Many are afraid of medication, but they have some new ones out now that aren't so harsh on your system. If it's a way you can work and exist from day to day, it is worth it.

I hope your friend gets through it soon. Having a concerned buddy like you is definitely a great help.

:glomp:
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:iconmayahs:
mayahs Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2007
I am glad you wrote about that, not too long ago I had experienced something similiar, so often I feel unable to draw and my hands shake, I even can't use my wacom, my finger trembles and the lines goes up and down like am a 1 year old kid trying to draw , but this is not permenant ( I believe), it happens occasionaly .. if you can monitor the stress factor, someone prescribed 5 HTP and valerian 9 natural ingredients) for me and it has improved my depression and stress which is coming from my current situation, what s/he needs is to ask a doctor ( to make sure it is not related to physical problem) if it is not then perhaps soem therapy such as yoga, mediation , and /or message to the wrist and arm.( bath salts can help improve their mental state), I know how stressful it can be to work with a demanding editor/manager, wish them all the luck.
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:iconanaxi:
Anaxi Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
Personally, I never get writers block or artist's blank page syndrome. I feel like I am always tapped into the creative conduit. But where I fail is motivation. I haven't got it. I get excited by a project and then realize how many brush strokes it's gonna take and my heart sinks into my stomache and my hands start shaking.

It's incredibly frustrating. I wish there was a way to fix it.. but I refuse to take medicine. I barely take aspirin for headaches. :/

The only thing that seems to help is creating art in the same room with other artists. Working with a team, or simply next to other artists or even musicians seems to energize me. Which is why I do fine in art school and slump miserably when I live alone.
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:icononnagata-stock:
Onnagata-stock Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2007
I've noticed that, too. It seems much easier to create new things when you have other creative people to bounce ideas off of. It may be an entirely psychological thing, but just about all of the artists I've worked with have said pretty much the same thing.
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:icongeladrial:
Geladrial Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
Hmm, i suffer from SAD (seasonal affective dissorder) and basically go through an absolute heart breaking depression during the winter months. I become absolutely idol - I don't even like to go out, I have my curtains closed day and night and lay on my bed in a strange narcotic dream state. It's very strange. I am still perky and happy but my creativity when it comes to Photographs becomes non existant and instead I end up writing poetry full of gross imagery that only I understand.

I find for me Poetry is for the winter months and photography in the summer and spring, maybe advise your friend to write a journal, poetry or even small tales. She/he can always Splurge... when you just write whatever comes to your head all over a piece of paper... I find eventually after a good Splurge I'm inspired by something I've written.
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:iconarabianne:
arabianne Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
I also find that my art is cyclical - I write more in the winter, and draw/paint/create in the summertime. Perhaps there is more of a cyclic link to creativity than previously imagined.
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:icongeladrial:
Geladrial Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2007
:nod: it's wierd isnt it :shrug:
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:iconkita-dawg:
kita-dawg Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
I have the same problem. Therapy helps, if you find a good therapist. It really is not about the art as much as it is about the person and how they feel the art reflects them. At least, that is how it is for me. I see my art as reflecting me, so if I make shitty art, I see myself as a shitty person. And it can be difficult to disconnect yourself from something you have emotionally invested so much energy into. Art, for many, is an extension of them. And when it is rejected, the person feels rejected.

*shrugs* Not much I can say to help, since I am still dealing with it myself. But the best wishes to your friend :hug:
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:iconlilastock:
lilastock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
i've never been prolific, but i understand what it is like not to be able to do something you love because of something like that. i'm bipolar. I have these insanely productive creative phases where i'm so depressed that i seriously want to die, and then i have these manic phases where i start a million different things and never finsih any of them. i perscribed to meds, but i don't take them because i don't write and i dont dream when im on them. they leave me totally zonked. for some people that is a good preventative measure, but i would never kill myself so i just don't take them. The best advice i could give to your friend is to just try some change, dont force art out, try taking pictures, or even just getting more excercise, anything to change daily life and allieviate stress.
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:iconphantoms-siren:
phantoms-siren Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
I've suffered from on-off depression for as long as I can remember, since I was a very young child at least. Creativity has really been the only thing that helps. Though if I'm depressed and fail to create what I'm aiming for I get more depressed so it doesn't always help.

I stopped creating for a year after I was told that I had no talent and failed my art A-level in school. I know now that I failed because I wasn't a good little automaton who did what the examboard wanted but at the time it really knocked my nonexistant confidence.

i dont really know what to suggest fro your friend, when I burn out I do random things without purpose, usually stuff i've not tried before like taking photos of household objects or making random collages, like freeform expression. doesn't matter if it sucks its just something new and without pressures, also sometimes cool things result from it.
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:icondrinking-mercury:
Drinking-Mercury Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
I am currently beginning to come to terms with what might be a psychological illness. I haven't drawn in 2-3 years. I don't paint anymore. I don't find the patience to do so - due to all the noise in my head. I photograph, as it's not something that is all that time consuming - I've never set up a scene or a still life, because that would cause me to have to focus. Right not, quick photos is the only thing I manage to do.

I'd definitely join a chatroom - in fact, I've looked for one.
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:icononnagata-stock:
Onnagata-stock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
You mentioned "noise in your head" -- is it just a nonstop mass of organized thoughts, or more like random neurons firing? Also, does it get worse when you try to relax or sleep?

When I was hyperadrenal (producing too much cortisol/adrenalyn), one of the big symptoms was a sort of "mental static" that made it hard to focus on things.
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:iconandrewfphoto:
andrewfphoto Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
Well, this is me coming out I suppose - I have suffered since my early teens, 12 was my first real episode, so it's been a long time.
The depressive parts are bad bad bad, and contrary to the thinking of some people, there is absolutely NO benefit to creativity in these phases....... and the manic parts are just as bad. As you pointed out above, the maxing of cards, buying of cars, animals, everything is a symptom.....and lasts for years as you struggle to pay off the debts - exarcebated by the fact that you are then not in the position to work due to the low swng.
I was prescribed Lorazepam for 10 years, which stole virtually all of my twenties... I am just finishing two years of Citalopram. And now IS a reasonably bad time, but I avoid any alcohol or cannabis, or any drug and try to keep my mind occupied - BUT, these short cold days are nightmarish.
I would love to write more, but haven't time at the moment, so YES to a forum!

Andrew
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:iconjaspenelle:
jaspenelle Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
I get burned out and depressed, especially at the end of December and January are my big bad months. I get SAD (seasonal depression) and while a lot of people think it is not a real disease, I can assure you it truly is. Does your friend go through phases of depression, perhaps she has SAD.

While it has by no means cured me I bought a special for my craft table that helps me so much so that the block does not slam down on my crafting fingers. I also take a vitamin D supplement.

When I just get general depression (which is not very common for me) but normally comes with cabin fever, I just need to GET OUT of my studio and get with friends and nature (things that inspire me) so get my craft bone relocated. Sometimes, so matter how much you love doing something you just need time away from it.

I hope that was of some help.
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:icononnagata-stock:
Onnagata-stock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
Something that a friend of mine with seasonal depression tried was putting a full-spectrum lightbulb at her work table. The added sunlight -- simulated though it was -- seemed to help take a little of the edge off of her depression.

And if nothing else, it's better for your eyes than other lights, anyway. ;)
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:iconeidotink:
eidotink Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007  Student
Hello there! I just wanted to throw my two cents in here, as I have also had experience with the depression/anxiety/stress/medication route.

It sounds like your friend would really benefit from talking with a counselor and learning a few relaxation techniques (deep breathing, yoga, etc). If they do see their GP, please ask them to really research any medication that may be prescribed, and the best way of weaning off them. Sometimes the GPs are not sufficiently informed about side effects and ESPECIALLY the withdrawal effects of anti-anxiety/anti-depressants. And some meds are better than others, though everyone responds differently to different drugs. But some are just evil. Like Paxil. It's been banned in parts of Europe, but for some reason it was being handed out like candy here in the U.S. That's some hard-core-no-fun-at-all withdrawal.

Sometimes lifestyle factors such as sleep, diet, caffeine, nicotine, etc. can have a heavier effect than people realize... and stress can become a monster to people who haven't yet crafted their own kind of shield.

Good luck to you and your friend. Maybe some blind contour sketches, just for release? Abstract geometry, or upside down simple still-lifes? Anything that's not a "required" creative effort.
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:iconkatespada:
KateSpada Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
I just went through a long period of about the same thing but probably not for the same reasons. I just didn't have it in me to do anything artistic for about a year. I was very depressed and whenever I began to work on something I lost interest and could find no joy in it so I would just stop. Eventually it went away. I had no inspiration for a while because of the depression. But it has come back with a vengence. I feel more creative now than I did before I stopped creating a year ago. So I hope your friend gets through this and finds their spirit again. Best hopes and wishes for them! :hug:
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:iconravynnephelan:
ravynnephelan Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
I'm very open about the fact that I have suffered from depression on and off all of my life. The first and longest episode started when I was 15 years old and consumed my life until I was 33. But my depression was born from a repression of my creativity. In high school I was told I had no talent. I was told that I would never become an artist. I was told this almost every lesson, and after a while I believed it.

My parents and friends were never openly supportive either, so with my dreams blown to oblivion I went and started a hairdressing apprenticeship instead of going to college to study visual arts, and I did not paint or think about painting again for almost 13 years.

Honestly, I was never medicated because I was taught to hide my deepest hurts by my father who did exactly the same thing. I never told anyone I was unhappy. I hid it behind smiles, drugs, alchohol and sex. I am surprised I lived to see my 21st birthday, but I did, and when I was 23 the man I will always love came into my life and saved me. I stopped drinking. I stopped partying. I stopped trying to kill myself through choices that were let me just say ... risky.

However, when I had my kids my depression worsened with anxiety attacks. The next five years were truly even more scary than the eight years before. And when I gave up smoking after 13 years I went totally off the deep end and landed myself in hospital with some rather nasty psychological issues. I was diagnosed with long term clinical depression and they wanted to medicate me as they believed it would be the only way to bring me some relief. Maybe if I had said yes to the medication I would have healed a lot faster, but I didn't because I have what is classed as a genetic predisposition towards addiction, i.e. my aboriginal ancestory makes me more vulnerable to both psychological and physical addiction and I was terrified of replacing several addictions for another.

I battled on for another year before visiting an old family doctor. He had always been open to talking, so that is what we did. We talked about the issues that were haunting me and through our talks he discovered that I had once loved to paint and introduced me to the concept of healing through creativity.

It didn't take much after that to rekindle the desire to create and I've been painting on an almost daily basis ever since. To create is to heal in my case and painting is a form of meditation. I can turn off everything else and literally clear my mind of everything but the artwork in front of me.

Not once since I began to paint again have I been blocked in any way. In fact, I need to paint. If I don't I get ... irritable. That's the politest way to describe what I become. However, I always take some very simple steps to prevent burn out. I 'create' every day, but I always take several days downtime after finishing a painting. Instead of painting I draw, or write, or take photos, or work on my websites.

I've been told that to paint a picture is the same mentally and emotionally as running a marathon. An artist is not meant to pump out art on demand and working as a professional illustrator can truly have some detrimental effects. Oh, it can be done, but burnout and creativity blocks are the risk the artist runs as a result. I won't force my muse, and I don't go against my muse. If 'she' is not interested in painting a certain hire then I won't take on that hire.

*grins* and now I am going to hush before I write a whole book. I'm not sure if anything I have said will help, but one very important thing I have discovered in my years of ups and downs is that the only right answers are the ones that work for the individual and sometimes all the best advice needs to be graciously ignored and instead the voice within listened to.
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:iconrachastock:
Rachastock Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
That's some good advice about listening to yourself. As far as the medication goes, I'm not an addictive type and I was put on anti-depressant medication that I did get addicted to. So basically, I don't think you should regret not going on medication... Talking it through is really the only way. Medication really doesn't help a lot anyway, just gives you a false up for awhile, but the issues are still there. It's a wonderful thing that you found something to be passionate about.
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:icononnagata-stock:
Onnagata-stock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
Well, I've known people that medication has actually worked for (myself most certainly not one of them) :giggle: ). If done correctly, a regemin of medication is supposed to alter your body chemistry to a favorable balance, then as you wean yourself off of them, your body picks up the slack and corrects itself.

That's at least how it's supposed to go. Everyone's reaction is different, however, and the real key is to find what is the right resolution for the individual. In *artoftheempath's case, I'm really glad that it turned out to be what she had been wanting (and denying herself) all along. :)
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:iconrachastock:
Rachastock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
I've heard of people that medication has worked for as well. From what I have heard it seems anti-depressants were only designed to be taken for short periods and at one tablet. It's when you take it for longer and with a higher dosage that you get addicted. I looked my medication up actually and there are lot of people who have had a lot of trouble getting off it, but there are no labels on the medication warning of this.

You're right though, everyone is different and recovers from these downfalls in different ways. Mine was through writing and *artoftheempath's was through painting. Maybe yours was through your art as well. It's good to find some something to be passionate about... even if you take a long break sometimes, like I am.
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:iconravynnephelan:
ravynnephelan Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Talking about it is sometimes the only way to find healing. Many of my problems stemmed from events that occurred in my childhood and teenage years. While a good part of what I suffered from was born from having felt unimportant and worthless. Medication is not going to change feelings and banish hurts. Only time, forgiveness and awareness will do that.

Like one of the other DA peeps who posted, I had to totally rewire my thought processes. I had to look for destructive thoughts and turn them around so that I began to think in a more positive manner, and thankfully because I write as well I was able to pour out a lot of the hurt in the form of poetry and letters that nobody but I will ever read.

However, the most important thing I realised I had to do was to forgive myself for not being perfect. None of us are, and we become so hard on ourselves when we cannot live up to the sometimes unreasonable demands we place upon ourselves.

*smiles* I'm passionate about a lot of things, but my art, my love, and my children are what sustain me.
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:iconrachastock:
Rachastock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
A lot of my problems were from my childhood as well, particularly my controlling father and the domestic abuse he inflicted on my mother and then many years down the track when I had learnt to respect him again, he started hurting my step-mother. It's hard seeing someone you admire hurting someone else, particularly when everyone else in the family is happy to ignore it.

But despite saying that, I know what you mean about banishing your own self-defeating thoughts and I know that we have to take our own responsibility for making our own lives what we want them to be. I found writing to be a great form of release as well. Writing is what I'm most passionate about, it comes naturally to me... though I haven't done it for awhile. I'm not sure why. Alas, I'm really happy to hear that life is going well for you. It is certainly a wonderful thing to be surrounded by loving family members and also to be able to find something that you love to do.
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:icononnagata-stock:
Onnagata-stock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
I was another one of those kids who were told that I had no talent. My band director even declared this to my parents, in front of me -- as well as all of the other band students and their parents. :blush:

I still feel a vengeful twinge of happiness each time I finish a song. :D

I'm sorry that it took you so long to claw your way out of your depression, but I'm very glad that you did -- even moreso that what you needed for it was something you already loved to do.
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:iconrealityhelix:
realityhelix Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I do not have such a personality, I fear.
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:iconlyricalsiren:
LyricalSiren Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
I've been suffering with depression for about 6 months but there was alot of circumstances that contributed to bring it on. I've been to the doctor, and they of course want to run and write a script. Although I have heard meds help, I've also hear how they have screwed people up and really affected those who are creative in a negative way artistically. So I opted to not take meds and try a natural approach. The only thing I can say is the only release I find is when I'm painting. So much of my work represents my life and things I have went through, etc.
I just feel better after completing a piece, as if I purged the emotion that was bottled up inside. That and B vitamins seem to take the edge off.
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:icongiligadi:
Giligadi Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
An interesting question, or set of questions, i guess...
I've been repeatedly diagnosed as bi-polar, anti-social, etc, and i find that my creativity is certainly linked to depression, but the linkage has unpredictable and erratic effects. Luckily for me, i don't depend on any of my various artistic pursuits for income, because if i did, i would often be completely fucked.
perhaps if your friend delved briefly into another of their creative outlets, they might find themselves more inclined to draw.
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:iconmewtwofan:
Mewtwofan Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
I'm not really one to talk, as I've never been diagnosed with depression... although I'm almost certain I did have it back in my middle-school years... Suicidal thoughts don't come JUST from hormones. *shiver* Though I'm glad to say I've been past that nasty part of life for quite awhile now.

Although, I don't put much stock in this trend of "you must be cured of every little thing!" that's going on right now. All the really awesome and intelligent people in history had something "wrong" with them. Try to get rid of all those "wrongs" and you'll wind up with a race of brainless pencil-pushers. I'm not saying that all illnesses like depression should be treated in such a way... in some it most certainly does require help and medication, and there's nothing wrong with that... but it just seems like society wants to fly to the extremes all the time. Either it's "all in your head" or it's "zomg it's a disease, cure it!!!1" Some people need to realize that life REQUIRES adversity on some level. And those that can overcome greater adversity often become greater people. ;P

As for myself, right now it's not so much depression as it is creative boredom. I haven't had inspiration to draw anything for quite awhile now. Or when I do draw something I get tired of drawing before I can ever finish it. Bleh.
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:iconlockstock:
lockstock Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
Sounds like you've got a low battery so to speak and maybe some time and other pursuits will help recharge your creativity!
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:iconmewtwofan:
Mewtwofan Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2007
I think I need a new battery, it doesn't want to recharge! :XD:
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:iconjobobarikan:
JobobArikan Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
one must distinguish between ego meloncholy and the level of consciousness known as disallusionment.

Ideally the spirit Haephestos would automatically come to your friend and lift his veil, however a cat with white is preventing it-
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:iconkaremelancholia:
karemelancholia Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007

You got the point.
I'm bipolar (manic-depressive, this expression is no more used).
It's strange because it depends. When my crisis are high i sometimes can't create, i really don't have the envy, and on the opposite sometimes i can't stop myself creating. Of course darker and darker things.
When i'm quite in a normal mood well i have the envy to create but less darker.
Creating helps a lot, in avoiding crisis and anguishness.
It's terrible to be anguished, to have panic attacks, when you can't control nothing, your body... You need to have something else that occupies your mind, your brain...
That's my life, but by periods, by cycle...
That's the definition of bipolarity...

--

Mourning for L'Abbé Pierre. (learn more about him by clicking this link... he STILL deserving it! Humanity needs such human being).
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:iconpendlestock:
pendlestock Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007   Photographer
I'm like that at the moment. I've had a couple of huge opportunities to push my art career forward and both times I've balked. I go through phases, usually when I have a lot of work on, when I just *can't* draw. It scares me.

I do have depression though, it's a side effect of Fibromyalgia which I have suffered from my entire life. It's horrible, paralysing... so I do sympathise. But I can't offer any solutions - there simply aren't any. Not that I've discovered yet anyway.
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:iconlockstock:
lockstock Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
I hope you'll keep looking for solutions. When you're feeling depressed, it's hard to imagine that ANYTHING could help. I hope you're also reading all the other ideas here. Maybe something could work for you.
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:iconpendlestock:
pendlestock Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007   Photographer
I do look for solutions - I've been on medication for the last three years and do other things to try and build up my creativity but it's so difficult.
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:iconinfinitiveevil101:
InfinitiveEvil101 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
My advice to your friend would to remember why he started drawing in the first place. Was it for fun, because he's talented in the field, or is it an outlet that he can use to escape reality. Also think about his place among other artists. Does he stand out and bring something new to the table, or does he need improvement and is he depressed because of it.
He may just have to get away from the site a little while. I know all of these talented artists may make him feel small and he's probably trying to compare his work to theirs. This is how I've been feeling and I haven't drawn in a while either. Or I could be wrong, I don't know. Just something to try.
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:iconlockstock:
lockstock Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
Thank you so much. It seems to be the way of artists: to constantly compare themselves with others. I appreciate your insight to this.
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:iconinfinitiveevil101:
InfinitiveEvil101 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
Your welcome, and whatever the problem I hope your friend gets through it. :heart:
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:iconinfinitiveevil101:
InfinitiveEvil101 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
My advice to your friend would to remember why he started drawing in the first place. Was it for fun, because he's talented in the field, or is it an outlet that he can use to escape reality. Also think about his place among other artists. Does he stand out and bring something new to the table, or does he need improvement and is he depressed because of it.
He may just have to get away from the site a little while. I know all of these talented artists may make him feel small and he's probably trying to compare his work to theirs. This is how I've been feeling and I haven't drawn in a while either. Or I could be wrong, I don't know. Just something to try.
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:iconmelyannam:
MelyannaM Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
I can't do art when I have personal problems but I don't let it get me down. Your friend needs to vent asap and talk openly about the problem. If he/she's nervous because of the deadline or that he/she will not be able to fulfill the expectations of the boss... Then, think like this: She/he got the job because they liked her/his work at first palce, no? And your friend wouldn't be there if that wasn't the case. And if the deadline is the problem, that has to be discussed with the boss. (I was guessing because after the source of the problem is solved, blockade goes) And about the blokade...Well, your friend is a HUMAN BEING and not a machine that can produce art like it was something simple. If it was, his/her boss could do it by himself and he wouldn't need all those people who work for him. So, I can only say that your friend should not panick and remember how talented she/he is and embrace it as an experience from which something new can be learned. Blockade will pass and I'm almost sure that blockades don't happen only once in a life time. They are always there to make us learn something new and, after we learn , make us feel better about ourselves because we grew stronger.

I hope I could help even if it was just a little. :)

:kiss:es and :hug:s
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:iconlockstock:
lockstock Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2007
You've got lots of great points here. I wish people who hire creative folks would get a clue on how the creative mind works, because most of them think it's a constant flow and something really easy to just crank out. And also they need to trust their artists to know what works and what doesn't. If my friend had some actual creative control over the projects, it would be so much easier. Right now the bosses really do seem to want a drawing machine.
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:iconmelyannam:
MelyannaM Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2007
Uggggh that is ...UGHHHH I usually have the same problem when doing comissions. They hire you for your art and your creativity but they just can't stop braging with the things they'd do if they were me. Let the artist to the work for Christ's sake. But people are self-centered sometimes (or most of the time). So, I feel much more relaxed when they say: I trust you and I love your work, just do what you usually do when create. That makes me wanna do the work 5000 times better. A talk with the bosses would be good but I know that your friend might be afraid of it. Don't let the slave drivers bring him/her down! :hug:
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